Farm City Week History and Events

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The first Farm City Week was born in 1955 when Charles Dana Bennett, businessman from Vermont and Merle H. Tucker, Chairman of Kiwanis International Agriculture and Conservation Committee, were seated together on a train headed from Chicago to Washinton, D.C.

In 1955, the net farm income was declining. Farm cost, debts and property taxes were on were on the rise. Charles and Merle were having discussions about the poor public image of agriculture, the strong urban influence on ag policies and a growing population with no direct ties to agriculture. To them, it seemed that farm and city people were drifting farther and farther apart and they felt that positive public relations between farm and city dwellers must be improved. Mr. Bennett made these issues public and soon after that the National Farm-City Committee was created and coordinated by Kiwanis International. The Kiwanis coordinated Farm-City until 1988 when the American Farm Bureau  Federation assumed  the responsibility.

These same efforts continue today by trying to establish a better understanding between the agriculture community and urban dwellers. Across the entire country Farm-City events are planned by Cooperative Extension, Agri-Businesses, Farmers, Youth Groups, Civic Groups and other organizations to educate the public about the interdependence of agriculture and industry. Each year National Farm City Week is proclaimed by the President as being the week leading up to and including Thanksgiving Day. This year Alexander County will celebrate Farm City Week with a “Couples in Agriculture” photo display at our local library in Taylorsville. Various couples will be highlighted in their day to day agriculture endeavors such as poultry production, horticulture, beef production and so on. Viewers will get a glimpse of their life on the farm with a brief description on how they feel about working together towards a common goal of agriculture production. The photos will be on display beginning Tuesday, November 14th through Monday, November 20th. We will wrap up our Farm City Celebration with a dinner on Monday, November 20th at 6:30 p.m. where Allison Houchins will speak on the Agricultural History here in Alexander County. Tickets are $5.00 per person and can be purchased by visiting the Alexander Extension Center in Taylorsville.