Quality Hay Making Tips

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  • Set baler pickup tines about one inch above the ground. This helps prevent contaminating the hay with dirt, which raises ash percentages and reduces digestibility. Baler wear and tear caused by picking up stones also is reduced or eliminated.
  • Set the hay pickup flotation so that the pickup follows the contour of the ground at or just above the tine height setting. If the tines aren’t digging into the dirt, the flotation setting is about right. Regularly check the hay pickup for bent or broken tines and replace them as necessary. Be sure to stock up on replacement parts before the hay season begins.
  • Synchronize the field speed and the baler pickup speed so the hay is lifted from the windrow and flows into the bale chamber. Pickup loss is lower when windrows are heavy because the baler is operated at a slower field speed, and there is less contact between the hay and the baler components.
  • Bale chamber loss, particularly of the valuable leaves, is typically two to three times greater in round balers compared to square balers. To minimize bale chamber losses in round balers, the feed rate should be as high as possible to minimize the number of turns the hay makes within the bale chamber. This can be accomplished by using large windrows and high forward speeds. Since pickup losses are normally lower than chamber losses, it’s usually better to have some pickup loss by driving faster but reducing the amount of time it takes to form the bale.
  • Monitor bale density. Even if your baler has a density gauge, it is still critical to get out of the cab and “thump” bales to verify that the density is high enough so that bales hold their shape and provide maximum protection from the elements. You don’t want to be able to stick your fingers inside the bale.
  • Follow drive directional arrows on the baler monitor to make sure hay is fed consistently across the width of the bale chamber so bales have square shoulders. This helps round bales shed moisture, and improves stacking attributes of square bales.
  • Hay moisture at baling is a critical factor in determining superior hay quality and long storage life. Assessing moisture before baling depends on whether it is stem moisture or moisture from dew. The moisture present from dew will seep through the hay to some degree, while stem moisture will not. When the stem moisture is too high, spoilage can occur. Moisture at baling for large square bales should be no greater than 12 to 15 percent; for round bales, no greater than 16 to 20 percent; and no greater than 18 to 20 percent for small-square bales. The exception to this rule is when hay preservative is applied during baling, which allows hay to be baled with moisture content up to 30 percent.
  • To reduce leaf shatter and resulting nutrient losses, avoid baling when hay moisture is too low.

Future settlement prices from:  Friday, April 1, 2019-Thursday, April 7, 2016

Commodity Contract Mo. Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
Live Cattle April 132.97 133.2 130.67 132.07 132.42
($cwt) June 123.57 123.67 120.75 121.85 122.22
August 119.57 119.6 116.95 117.67 118.07
October 119.47 119.57 116.97 117.42 117.7
December 119.17 119.22 117.12 117.45 117.72
Feeder Cattle April 156.2 156.67 152.62 153.17 154.15
($/cwt) May 154.7 154.7 150.2 150.1 149.8
August 155 155.1 150.85 151.2 151.37
September 153.65 153.72 150.02 150.2 150.8
October 151.92 151.12 148.55 149.1 150.02
November 147.9 148.2 144.35 145.25 146.35

Written By

Photo of Allison BrownAllison BrownExtension Agent, Agriculture - Agronomy and Livestock (828) 632-4451 (Office) allison_brown@ncsu.eduAlexander County, North Carolina
Posted on May 4, 2016
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